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Posts Tagged ‘glass’

erica-rosenfeldErica Rosenfeld’s work tells stories about the fabric of pe0ple’s lives and the rituals created to bring comfort to our lives. “I use glass, found materials, beads and food to create sculpture and jewelry, which remain my primary mode of expression.   I began beading at the age of five, from which I realized a consistent impulse to create cohesive, sometimes incongruous, mosaics from smaller components.  In my twenties, I began working with glass, both blowing and kiln working. My instinct was, and remains, to sculpt and carve glass, creating form from seemingly shapeless substance.”

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lisa crowderThe Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show is always a great resource for post material.  Lisa Crowder’s enamel pieces are “kiln-fired vitreous enamel on copper stitched with thread — set in oxidized sterling silver. Pieces are completely hand fabricated — hand stitched. The copper is drilled prior to enameling. Multiple layers of enamel are then fired on both sides — then etched to create a matte finish. Once this is completed the piece is stitched — set in sterling.”

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Nirit Dekel was always ‘into art’, but she didn’t discover her passion for it until 2000. “As I graduate university I was swept into the high-tech wave and had a career in one of the largest high-tech firms in Israel. With time I felt that I’m missing my main love – art & craft. As I saw Chihuly’s exhibition at David’s tower in Jerusalem’s wall as part of the festivities of year 2000 it was like an alarm clock waking me back to life. I was drawn as magnet to the glass material and immediately fell in love with it. I’m fascinated by glass because I find it a manifold material. It’s a daily life casual material yet has the ability of becoming delicate, refined and elegant and can be played with in an infinite possibilities.”

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William Glasner worked glass in a traditional manner until a visit to Venice in 1982, where he discovered glass faceting or carving. Recently, he started applying this method to a series of carved beads that are jewelry proportion. “The hand-carved beads featured in this jewelry are unique in the 3500-year history of glass bead making. Amazingly, even though people have been creating glass beads for millennia and carving glass for nearly as long, extensive research has been unable to yield historical examples of similar carved glass beads. In making my beads, traditional techniques are combined in an innovative way to create a historically new bead style.”

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Rob Snyder’s work appears to be a pile of sticks held together by hidden connections. It is hard to believe they are sticks of…GLASS. “Making art is a direct reflection of my journey through life. My approach is centered in letting go of preconceived notions of both process and outcome. This requires a quiet yet playful frame of mind, allowing me to create without questioning direction. It is a slow unveiling of form out of chaos and spaciousness—allowing enough stillness in mind, and then saying yes to what appears. The Sufi poet, Rumi, eloquently speaks of this as being played like a hollow reed.”

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Occasionally, while researching post material, I stumble across an artist that makes all of the dead ends worthwhile….Waylande Gregory.  “Waylande Gregory was one of the most renowned American sculptors of the 20th century; with pieces collected by the Met, the Whitney, and the Smithsonian. Inspired by the complexity of nature and abstract motifs, Waylande Gregory’s advanced techniques and patented methods of glazing and glass sculpting revolutionized fine ceramics and helped define the Art Deco era.”

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Lara Knutson works with a fiber filigreed with 50,000 mirror-backed glass beads per square inch…the 50,000 is not a typo.  The same glowing fiber can also be found in emergency workers’ uniforms and athletic clothing. Her work is sold in museum stores throughout the country and has been purchased by the Corning Museum of Glass.

Surgery went very well and we are both breathing a huge sigh of relief. Thank you for keeping us in your thoughts and prayers.

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