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Posts Tagged ‘enamel’

lauren pollaroLauren Pollaro is drawn to combinations of unexpected materials that take the viewer on a visual journey. “I find it satisfying to harmonize the chaos of so many disparate materials and options. I first surprise myself with certain combinations and discoveries and then it is my intent to take the viewer on a visual journey. I believe there is so much to see upon close observation of most anything. I hope for the viewer and/or wearer to make continual discoveries in my work and to feel a pleasing connection with my pieces.”

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linda dartyLinda Darty’s Garden Badge Series celebrates memories of her childhood and attending garden club meetings with her mother in a small town in North Carolina. “The women in this small town would gather monthly, meeting with armfuls of flowers and greens that were spread over tables. These badges pay tribute to their efforts to create and formalize a time in their lives to celebrate beauty, community, and friendship while also expressing my ongoing inspiration from nature.
I’m intrigued by what kinds of badges I would identify myself with as the adult person I’ve become, not only what I would wear now, but what would be left behind for some future relative to pour over in a long forgotten jewelry box. I would want them to find flowers, leaves and branches of silver and blossoms of delicately painted glass, and to remember that I wore and made them to keep them alive in my life… that in the midst of the technology, the construction and destruction of this world so often at war, there is beauty to be treasured.”

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carly wright2Ciffs revealing sedimentary rock inspire the work of Carly Wright. “I believe that the images that I see on my daily walks, give me a vocabulary. I often stop to sketch , or pick up a stone or a piece of bark. These small objects sit on my drawing table for weeks, sometimes years. When I sit down to design new pieces I look to them for inspiration, and try to convey something of what I see in them to others. I am also drawn to architectural symbols such as windows or doors.”

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frey willeIn Frey Wille’s homage series, the focus is now on Expressionist painter Egon Scheile. “The themes of expressionism were diverse, experimental and radical. Artists expressed their deepest emotions through strong colour and design. They did not want to paint pretty pictures, or even realistic ones—they used ugliness, distortion and disassociation to express their own feelings, and elicit strong emotional reaction.” 

The Frey Wille site has a fascinating series of photos that focus on the design process. The elements and colors may provide inspiration for your next project. 

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daria salusDaria Salus grew up in Chicago, but her work as a jeweler began in Santa Cruz, California. “For over two decades, Daria has used her ever-developing “deep connection to the ocean and forest environments” as a springboard for creativity, crafting pieces that are at the same time personal and universal, connecting hand-crafted art with the spirit of nature.”

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priscilla frakePriscilla Frake looks to the past and the heavens to inspire her work. As an enamelist, she is working “in the ancient art of fusing glass onto metal. Enamel was widely used and prized in the ancient world for its brilliant colors and for its durability and resistance to wear.” Her recent work“involves an exploration of modern and ancient images of the cosmos. I am inspired by photographs from the Hubble Space Telescope, and also by illustrations from Renaissance and alchemical texts. My work attempts to investigate the disparity between what we feel about the universe and what we now know about it.”

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anne havelAnne Havel’s influences change daily because she translates the changing world around her. “The world is imperfect and that is reflected in much of Anne’s work–not a perfect circle or square–rough around the edges. Even nature, which is the closest anything comes to perfection, manifests its “perceived flaws” in the imperfect flower, the decaying tree bark, or the mold-ridden fence-post. All these beautiful “flaws” drive her work.”

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