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Posts Tagged ‘diamonds’

ncrocksThe Mother-Daughter team of Nadine Hammoud and Cherine Altobaishi design jewelry that is inspired by their Lebanese heritage and their travels to exotic locales. Timeless in style and modern in expression, NC Rocks creations recall the abstract musings of artists like Al Held and Pablo Picasso, Wassily Kandinsky and Piet Mondrian. They honor the stylized ornamentation of art deco, the contoured fashions of the 30s and 50s, and the liberal, versatile vibe of the 70s.

My New Years resolution to post on a timely basis was foiled by technology…our internet connection evaporated on New Years day and did not return until today.

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1697_searchSolange Azagury-Partridge has a rather eclectic mix of inspirations…Berbers, Rubies, the Moon, Gargoyles etc….but first on the list “LIONS”.  “I feel a huge love and affinity with Lions. My star sign is leo, my hair is big and frizzy like a lion’s mane, I’m a carnivore, I’m from Africa, I’m sociable and lazy”

Like the inspirations, her work encompasses a wide variety of styles and several categories. Rings, in the jewelry category, move from refined to playful and then into edgy. I was attracted to the stairway in her London showroom. Each step is carpeted in a different pattern, creating a riot of color. HMMM!!! I wonder if I can talk my husband into that for the stairway to his loft office!!!

solange azaguryA recent article in the Wall Street Journal featured Solange and highlights of her work over the past 28 years. The 1999 ‘Nature Ring’ for a mere $24,500 caught my eye…but the 1996 ‘Hotlips’ ring is still a best seller…$9,600.

 

 

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cartierThe June/July Town & Country features several pages of black and white clothing, jewelry & shoes. Including this bracelet from Cartier was a bit of a stretch for black and white…but it does feature that crisp contrast that always feels cool and fresh, regardless of the temperature. At $286,000, this bauble may not be in your budget, but the swirl of light and dark may be just what you need for your next design. 

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linda ladurner3Linda Ladurner’s work speaks for itself…bold, focused fascinating. While her internet presence is confined to Pinterest,…what could be better than letting your work tell your story? “I work alone, with silver, gold and gemstones, and only make one of a kind. I make jewellery for the human body, my pieces must be easy to wear, and nice to touch. I want women (or men) to be active, my pieces should accompany them anywhere, it gives my works more life and meaning. Wearability, also durability are aspects in jewellery I very much care about.”

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sarah grahamSarah Graham’s career as a jeweler had a rather circuitous route. After earning a masters degree in international business and working in that field, she realized her true path lay elsewhere. “Her jewelry is inspired by a variety of sources. The names of her lines – Pebbles, Oyster, Conifer and Bamboo, even Foil and Paper Chain – are clues as to their origins. “What I love about nature is that you get geometry, but then you get mutations and anomalies, too,” says Sarah, who maintains that observations of the natural world taught her the patience necessary for the jewelers’ process.”

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alex sepkusPardon my mumbles, but my muse starts throwing out possibilities when I scroll through images of Alex Sepkus‘ work. “Alex Sepkus makes no sense. Somewhere between P.G. Wodehouse (of whom he is a big fan) and a worn flagstone from a medieval church floor, Alex found timeless beauty. So, perhaps he makes perfect sense.”

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David Webb moved from Asheville, NC to Manhattan at the age of 16. “His special gifts as a jeweler and designer soon became apparent, and shortly after his arrival, he was noticed by Antoinette Quilleret, a French woman with exquisite taste and an eye for talent. In 1948, with her backing, he formed David Webb Inc., setting up shop on 57th Street. Within a few years, David Webb had established himself as the ‘go to’ jeweler in Manhattan, and at the height of production his two full-time workshops employed 200 jewelers and 37 setters.”

After his untimely death in 1975, “the rich tradition of design, craftsmanship and creativity continues by drawing on the immense archives of illustrations, models and molds, that represent the legacy of David Webb, a unique American genius.”

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