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Archive for the ‘green design’ Category

monique peanAs you scroll through the work of Monique Pean, you may be struck by a simple yet powerful design aesthetic. “MONIQUE PÉAN uses environmentally responsible procedures to source its materials, and uses 18 carat recycled gold and platinum, conflict and devastation free precious stones, diamonds and fossils, which are gathered with no mining involved. MONIQUE PÉAN is a member of the No Dirty Gold campaign and a supporter of the Too Precious to Wear campaign.”

The stone in this dramatic ring is Kyanite. Some believe kyanite is a calming stone, helping to quiet the mind and dissolve feelings of anger and frustration.

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Angela-OKelly2Irish artist, Angela O’Kelly, combines nontraditional jewelry materials…paper & fabric…with precious metals to create bold, layered pieces. “I’m attracted to clashing colours in nature” she says. Texture is really important in her work. Boglands and the seaside rock formations inspire lightweight materials that don’t weigh the wearer down. “My designs are not for the everyday”, she explains. “More occasion wear than day wear, each design is a decorative object in its own right that you can admire as an art object when you’re not wearing it.”

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Julia-Turner-Blue-Field-RingOver the course of a 20 year career as a metalsmith, Julia Turner became frustrated with the sheer weight of metal and moved to other materials, seeking more warmth, color and volume.  “Among the dozens of objects arranged on an 8-foot table in her sun-washed jewelry studio are bowls of beads, chunks of wood – some natural, some stained colors ranging from canary yellow to cerulean blue – a roll of safety-orange duct tape, postcards, a shard of shiny black record vinyl, several books, and a carefully trimmed and shaped lump of charcoal salvaged from a backyard barbecue. Vignettes, color stories, and contrasting geometries play out across the 32 square feet, which, viewed from above is like the love child of Wassily Kandinsky and Josef Albers.”

You can read more about Julia’s work in the February/March issue of American Craft.

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I am ashamed to say that I have NEVER successfully mastered riding a skateboard. But, after visiting MapleXO’s site, I may try my hand at recycling one. “Recycling skateboards wasn’t a new idea. People have been doing it since the 70’s and my first personal attempt wasn’t to make jewelry, it was to make a clock for my wall at home. Next I made a chalkboard, some magnets and eventually my friend Amanda and I just put the scraps from all these skateboard crafts on some earring hooks and wore them around. Didn’t think much of it until all my friends and people from work started asking me to make them some skateboard earrings. Looking back on it now is funny, because the earrings were literally raw pieces of broken skateboards dangling on ear wires. To be honest, the first pair may just have been random wire that we bent into makeshift earrings hooks!”

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Our second surprise post from the Saturday Wall Street Journal is Flip Flop art from Diederik Schneemann. “It are the Flip Flops’ telling the story. They are discoloured, worn, torn, patched up and eventually tossed away or lost. After a long trip through Asia or Africa they end up in sewers and in the ocean. Then they are washed up on the shores of Eastern Africa. There they are found, collected, and eventually reclaimed. Turned into a collection of sustainable design objects in which the eventful travel tales of worn Flip Flops is captured and translated.”

Tomorrow we will return to our world of art jewelry…and yes, inventory still lurks in the background…UGH!!!

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With the costs of raw materials for jewelry skyrocketing, we have all begun to look for alternative materials for our work.  Inari Kiuru describes herself  as “a migrant, graphic designer, an occasional photographer and a new jeweller, living in Melbourne, Australia. This blog is my attempt to remember: to document, preserve and reflect on the ordinary and the breathtaking in each day.”

Her jewelry appears to incorporate enamels with recycled industrial elements…recycle-repurpose-reuse.

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Orly Ruaimi’s home page states she makes cool jewelry for bold people. “Orly designs and develops her unique jewelry line, while remaining socially and environmentally conscious.  The collections, draws inspiration from nature with a combination of a mechanical touch to show that both can create a beautiful and interesting union.  Each piece is sculpted by hand with an organic and industrial flair – combined for a distinct new look.”

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